Topic: satire

The Seven Best Things To Come Out Of The Chik-Fil-A Homophobia Controversy Thus Far

The Seven Best Things To Come Out Of The Chik-Fil-A Homophobia Controversy Thus Far

Over the past few weeks, America has been saddened to learn that one of its most beloved fast food chains donates millions of dollars a year to anti-gay causes. But despite how frustrating it is that such primitive bigotry still exists in 2012, a few good things have come out of this kerfuffle: dialogue, backlash, and lots and lots of anti-homphobia satire. Here are a few of my favorite things that the Chik-Fil-A controversy has given us so far. More »

Best Week Ever’s Fake Posters Sum Up Our Feelings On ‘Whitney’ Succinctly

Best Week Ever's Fake Posters Sum Up Our Feelings On 'Whitney' Succinctly

As we have already spent time telling you, the promotional materials for NBC’s new show Whitney make it look like the whole of the show’s “humor” lies in reiterating sexist stereotypes about men and women. Women love to shop and cry! Men love to look at boobs and watch football! And so forth. Well, the cut-ups over at Best Week Ever seem to agree with us, and they took it one step further by making some awesome Photoshopped posters that capture the ad campaign’s true spirit. Click through for two more. More »

Video: For Mel Brooks’ Birthday, Reminisce on His Best Movies

Video: For Mel Brooks' Birthday, Reminisce on His Best Movies

Mel Brooks, the man who introduced me to satire, is 85 today. During my childhood, when I wasn’t geeking out over the Star Wars universe, I was eagerly watching all of his irreverent movies — Robin Hood: Men in Tights, Blazing Saddles, High Anxiety, Spaceballs — and quoting them to anyone within earshot. I wanted to post here a collection of multiple clips, but it wouldn’t embed, so I’m going with the next best thing: A great scene from Dracula: Dead and Loving It that has Leslie Nielsen as the vampire and Mel Brooks in one of his usual cameos, this time as Van Helsing. More »