Topic: eating disorders

The Dos and Don’ts of Drama, with Degrassi: Messy Politics

The Dos and Don'ts of Drama, with Degrassi: Messy Politics

“Don’t Panic” parts 1 and 2 did a smart job of giving us a lot of payoff on two arcs that were slowly building up during Now or Never. Sav and Ms. Oh finally give in to their feelings, thanks to some sappy songs with really obvious lyrics — it’s not as scandalous as we would’ve liked, but there’s promise for next week’s prom finale. What was really excellent was the reveal of Type A overachiever Katie‘s one weakness: She suffers from bulimia. And it’s her supposed best friend Marisol who tells everyone! More »

Space Relations: When To Help a Roommate With an Eating Disorder

Space Relations: When To Help a Roommate With an Eating Disorder

I was talking to a friend about this column recently and she asked me if I’d considered doing a column on what to do when your roommate has a serious problem, like an eating disorder. She went on to write about her roommate experience in an email, saying this:

In college, I was assigned a roommate named “Michelle.” Michelle was shy, still dating her hometown boyfriend long-distance, and didn’t go out a lot. She was also batshit crazy.

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New York Times Highlights The Plight Of Fauxbese Female Celebrities

New York Times Highlights The Plight Of Fauxbese Female Celebrities

Have you ever noticed that actresses eat a lot of fried and greasy food while being interviewed by journalists? It’s an annoying habit that seems intended to prove that said actress is not anorexic. But in reality, it usually goes to prove that she is full of LIES. Because 100 pound actresses don’t go around eating cheeseburgers and fries right before big events like the Oscars. It’s unpossible.

And now, thanks to The New York Times, we know of a new word for this phenomenon: DIPE. That stands for the documented instance of public eating, and is often a featured element in magazine profiles of female celebrities. But that abbreviation is not quite satisfying enough for us. We prefer the terminology that we just brainstormed: Fauxbese. More »

Crushable Quotable: Portia De Rossi Turned Healthy Living Into Anorexia

Crushable Quotable: Portia De Rossi Turned Healthy Living Into Anorexia

Portia De Rossi‘s new memoir Unbearable Lightness depicts her longtime struggle with anorexia, and one quote struck us this morning, since we’ve been writing about the subject of eating disorders and Black Swan lately. Namely, the fact that she thought she was being healthy when she dipped into anorexia.

According to JustJared, Portia writes:

“I didn’t decide to become anorexic. It snuck up on me disguised as a healthy diet, a professional attitude. Being as thin as possible was a way to make the job of being an actress easier…”

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True Story: I Was An Anorexic Ballerina

True Story: I Was An Anorexic Ballerina

My name is Sarah, and I am a ballerina. I was a dancer from the time I was 4 years old until the age of 20. I became more serious about dance, specifically in ballet in my early teens and decided to focus on that, rather than tap or modern dance, because the company I danced with had a very large ballet collaboration with girls of every age and it had always fascinated me. I wanted to be a part of it. When I was in my early twenties, I moved away from the studio I had danced at my whole life. I was a good dancer, but I knew then and still know that I did not have what it takes to be a professional ballerina.

To become a professional ballerina, the first thing you need is a lot of time – to rehearse for multiple hours at a time, every day. As a student, I couldn’t devote that time. Your body has to look a certain way, all the way down to your feet. Long, lean and thin are the adjectives that describe the way a ballerina should look. It takes an incredible amount of time and effort to make movements look effortless. People don’t realize this. More »

Eat Puke Dance: Black Swan’s Unhealthy Relationship With Food

Eat Puke Dance: Black Swan's Unhealthy Relationship With Food

Darren Aronofsky‘s much anticipated film Black Swan opens tomorrow night. And if you have the stomach for many bloody, aggressive, and violently visceral scenes involving ballerinas, it is an impressively powerful, disturbing movie worth checking out. But after watching the movie earlier this week, I haven’t been able to shake the film’s weird relationship with food and eating disorders.

The world of highly competitive ballet is a scary place. And Black Swan ups the voltage to 11. Natalie Portman plays Nina Sayers, a talented ballerina who pushes herself into dangerous physical and mental territory with a quest for balletic perfection. But the film’s stars also pushed themselves to dangerous limits to get in shape for the film, and that’s something that is hard to overlook while watching. More »