Topic: Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t

Crushable Weekends Need A Drink(ing Game)

Crushable Weekends Need A Drink(ing Game)

Hey, kids. I have some sad news for you: This is my last weekend as Crushable’s faithful Weekend Editor. It’s been a good run, but alas, it’s time to say goodbye. You’ll still be able to catch me over at BettyConfidential, though, so it’s not goodbye forever; it’s just a change of scene. That said, though, I’ll miss you all, and I’ll miss our weekend extravaganzas. So let’s make sure Crushable’s former weekends go out with a bang, shall we? This– obviously– calls for a drinking game! More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Dyatlov Pass Incident

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Dyatlov Pass Incident

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that looks at modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

At the end of January 1959, a Russian cross-country ski team ventured into the Northern Ural Mountains. Their expedition was intended to be a week-long skiing adventure, with the goal to reach a mountain in the Urals called Oroten. But though they set out from Vizhai—the last inhabited settlement that fat north—on January 27, they never came back. Or at least, they didn’t come back on their own. Numerous attempts have been made to reconstruct the events that had led to what has now become known as the DYATLOV PASS INCIDENT, with varying degrees of success. The trouble, you see, wasn’t that the team disappeared. It was the state they were in when they were found. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Staircase

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Staircase

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

There is a doorway in a building on the campus of an unnamed university. The door and its frame are made of reinforced steel, and it locks with an electro-release lock mechanism. At first glance, it appears to be nothing more than a janitorial closet. But the door will not open unless it is a certain number of electricity is applied while the door’s key is inserted and rotated counter-clockwise. Lest this opening procedure seem overly complicated, however, be assured that it is not. For if the door were easy to open, there is no telling how many countless individuals would have fallen prey to what lies behind it.

For behind it lies an anomaly known only as THE STAIRCASE. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Montauk Project

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Montauk Project

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

At the eastern end of Long Island’s southern point, there is an abandoned air force base. In the base sits an enormous radar dish. The dish, which had been installed by the government many years ago, was intended to provide warning of incoming Soviet threats from the Atlantic during the height of the Cold War. But as is the way with such things, as technology advanced, the dishes were rendered obsolete, and the site was closed in 1969. The area, called Montauk Point, has since become a public park.

But the radar dish is still there. And there are… stories. Tales of something going on, something bigger than the ghosts, real or metaphorical, that haunt every abandoned air force base and army site. Because you see, the experimentation with electromagnetic shielding hadn’t ended with the Philadelphia Experiment. It continued. And that continuation was known as THE MONTAUK PROJECT. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: Ghostwatch

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: Ghostwatch

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

Ghost Hunters, Most Haunted, Paranormal State, Ghost Adventures… These days, television is full of paranormal programming that purports to track ghostly phenomena, and each and every one of them swears up, down, left, and right that they’re the real deal. But in 1992, these types of shows were far from the norm. So when the BBC decided to air a 90-minute special on Halloween that claimed to be a live, on-air investigation of ongoing poltergeist activity at a house in Northolt, a neighborhood in west London, the public’s reaction was a great deal less jaded than our own would have been—especially given how the tragic events of the night unfolded. The program was called GHOSTWATCH, and it would go down in history as one of the BBC’s biggest mistakes. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Black-Eyed Children

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Black-Eyed Children

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

On January 16, 1998, a journalist named Brian Bethel posted a message to a ghost-hunting newsgroup prefaced with the following text:

“Ghosters:

Well, believe it or not, the Ram Page follow-up still languishes unfinished on my hard drive. I don’t know when I’ll have it done, and I’ll probably have to break it up into multiple posts to get it in any way manageable. Patience, I pray.
But since a lot of people seem to be requesting this one, here’s some info on those darned black-eyed kids.
I’ve just woken up from a mega nap. It’s 1 a.m. I’ll never get to sleep again. So why not write, eh? I guess I was exhausted from too many forays onto Sixth Street in Austin at my reporting conference.

Enjoy. Or whatever.”

Whatever the Ram Page follow-up was has been lost to history; but the important part is that second paragraph. This, you see, was the beginning of the legend known as THE BLACK-EYED CHILDREN.
More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Hanged King’s Tragedy

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Hanged King's Tragedy

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

The author of the play is unknown. It first appeared in print in 1640 in quarto form, a publication format issued in 1452 and used to great extent during the golden age of Renaissance drama. Its publisher, a William Cooke, disappeared from historical record shortly after the quarto’s appearance. The play does not appear in the Stationer’s Register, the official record book that documented publication copyrights in the 16th and 17th centuries; nor does it have an entry in the records of the Master of the Revels, which logged performance dates and information.

There is something very, very wrong with this play.

It is called THE HANGED KING’S TRAGEDY. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Philadelphia Experiment

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Philadelphia Experiment

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

Morris K. Jessup was perhaps an unremarkable man. Born near Rockville, Indiana on March 2, 1900, he seemed set on a scientific path from an early age: An interest in astronomy eventually led to a Bachelor of Science degree in the subject from the University of Michigan, which in turn led to a Master of Science degree earned during a time working at the U Mich-run Lamont-Hussey Observatory. But though Jessup began working on his doctorate in astrophysics, he ceased working on his dissertation in 1931 and never earned the degree. He spent the rest of his life working in decidedly unscientific jobs, including a substantial time as an automobile-parts salesman. But selling car parts wasn’t the only thing Jessup did with his time: He was also largely acknowledged as the most original extraterrestrial hypothesizer of the 1950s, and his 1955 book The Case for the UFO made waves in the extraterrestrial hypothesis community. So when mysterious letters started appearing in his mailbox insisting of the existence of a government experiment geared towards exploring the effects of new and unusual technology on Navy vessels, Jessup was understandably intrigued. That experiment would become infamous. It was referred to as THE PHILADELPHIA EXPERIMENT. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: ‘The Hands Resist Him’

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: 'The Hands Resist Him'

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

At 24” x 30”, it is a large painting, and a peculiar one. It depicts a boy. The boy stands in front of a window. He is clad in shorts and a blue t-shirt. Beside him is a girl—though she looks more like a doll than a human—who holds an angular object in her hands. The window behind them both reveals that it is nighttime: A crescent moon hangs in a black sky. But it is what is reaching out of the darkness that is truly unsettling. Outside the window, a number of disembodied hands reach towards the window, some rapping on it, some pressing themselves against it, and some merely held up as though seeking recognition. The boy, however, does not see the hands. He faces the viewer head-on.

The painting is called “THE HANDS RESIST HIM.” More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: Killswitch

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: Killswitch

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

In 1989, a small company known as the Karvina Corporation released a strange computer game. game. An early example of the survival horror genre, this game was said to have similarities to later games Myst and Silent Hill. So few people, however, have played this game that we have only the word of a handful that these similarities exist. Because this game had a unique feature: It automatically deleted itself once finished. It was not recoverable, and it could not be copied. It was a one-time event that existed only in the moments between the player’s initial start of the game and the player’s last move. The game was called KILLSWITCH. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: Camp Week Edition

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: Camp Week Edition

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

On the first day of April in 2010, redditor ducttape36 put up a post entitled, “I’m Going Camping This Week in VT… Creepy Details Inside.” Now, who could resist a title like that?

The previous summer, one of ducttape’s friends bought a house in the backwoods of Vermont. And when I say backwoods, I do mean backwoods—it was miles away from anything remotely resembling a town. It wasn’t unusual for the friend to find various forms of wildlife in his yard—deer, moose, coyotes, and so on—and he and his wife would often hear the animals’ cries and howls. Occasionally, though, the noises would sound… kind of odd. But ducttape brushed his friend’s claims off as just typical woods sounds—until he heard them for himself. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: The Dybbuk Box

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: The Dybbuk Box

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

In June of 2003, an auction appeared on eBay. This (naturally) was not an unusual occurrence. Nor, at first glance, was the object up for auction itself unusual: A small wooden cabinet, old, measuring 12.5″ x 7.5″ x 16.25″, intended for the storage of wine. The contents of the box, however, were somewhat less mundane: Inside the box were two locks of hair, one granite statue, one dried rosebud, one goblet, two wheat pennies, one candlestick– and one dybbuk (alternately spelled “dibbuk”), a malevolent spirit believed in Jewish folklore to be the dislocated soul of a dead person. Thus, the item’s name: THE DYBBUK BOX. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: This Man

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: This Man

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

In January of 2006 in New York, a psychiatric patient drew a picture of a face. The face is male, and he has beady eyes, bushy eyebrows, thin lips, and a receding hairline. He looks homely and a little odd, but also amiable and kind. The patient told her psychiatrist that this man has been repeatedly appearing in her dreams, and that he often offers her advice concerning the goings-on of her private life. She swears that she has never met the man before in her life. The portrait remains on the psychiatrist’s desk. Later, another patient spots it and says that the man has often appeared in his dreams, as well. This patient also swears that he has never met the man before in real life. Intrigued by this strange correlation, the psychiatrist sends a copy of the portrait to a handful of colleagues to see what they make of it. Within a few months, these colleagues report back that they, too, have had patients recognize the man and identify him as a regular player in their dreams. Since his first documented appearance in 2006, at least 2,000 people worldwide have claimed to have seen the man in their dreams. Invariable, they all refer to him as THIS MAN. More »

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t: EverymanHYBRID

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren't: EverymanHYBRID

Creepy Things That Seem Real But Aren’t is a new series that explores modern urban legends, bringing you a new tale each week.

There’s an amateur fitness series on YouTube called EVERYMANHYBRID that isn’t really much of a fitness series. Created by the titular “EverymanHYBRID” (whatever that means) Vincent, “Nutritional Correspondent” Evan, and cameraman Jeff, it likes to call itself “your go-to guide for health on a budget.” But there’s something hiding behind this series– and you may not like what you find. More »