Someone Should Tell Khloe Kardashian That It’s Only Okay To Wear Native American Artifacts In The Land Of NOPE

Lately it seems like making a mockery of other races and cultures is like, the new “thing” to do.  It pretty much goes hand-in-hand with wearing chevron prints and photo shoots at Whole Foods these days in celebrity-land.  People like Julianne Hough, Ireland Baldwin, and Pharrell Williams are basically trailblazers here, making their mark on the Dress Up Like A Caricature Of Another Race trend.  So it only makes sense that Khloe Kardashian follow suit and post this photo of herself getting in touch with her inner Native American.

Except…she’s not Native American! Hahahaha oh well who cares this headdress looks so hot on her OMG FEATHERS.  But in all seriousness, I blame North West.  Maybe if she didn’t have to have such an elaborate first birthday party (which actually had its own name and hashtag, “#Kidchella”) and suffered through grocery store cake and a clown or two like the rest of us, this wouldn’t have happened.  I don’t understand exactly what role traditional Native American artifacts played in a party for an infant who won’t remember any of it. You’d think by now, in 2014 and after many public mistakes similar to this one, people would learn it’s probably not a great idea to adorn themselves with cultural artifacts of other cultures that have been historically oppressed. But I stopped trying to comprehend Kimye‘s motives a long time ago.

Anyway! Khloe hasn’t made a comment, snide or otherwise, about the outcry over said photo yet but I’m sure it’s coming.  I don’t know if it’ll be super defensive and snarky or genuinely apologetic, but I’m willing to bet my bottom dollar it’ll mention the Native American blood of her ancestors that maybe runs through her veins, because justification!

Except no. This is not okay.  I can’t decide what I’m more offended by: the fact that she (the only Kardashian I find even remotely tolerable on limited occasions) posted this out of sheer ignorance and stupidity, or the fact that she knew it would cause a social media uproar and posted it anyway.  That bottom dollar of mine thinks it’s the latter.  Sigh.

You can reach this post's author, Cassandra Hough, on twitter.
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    • Isabelle

      Who makes the rule of what people can and cannot wear? Who is to say she meant to mock Native Americans?

      • Myndee

        Pretty sure Native Americans who have spoken out multiple times about people wearing their headdresses as fun props and it being incredibly offensive to them are the ones who have set it as a sort of rule. It’s offensive to them and their culture to wear something so important as a mere costume/accessory just for funzies. Its more than just a fashion statement to them.

      • Isabelle

        People who are PC just sound like a bunch of self righteous whiners at this point. I don’t understand it.

      • Cassandra Hough

        You’re right. Ignorance is bliss!

      • Isabelle

        Yea where’s the pleasure in getting upset over the drop of the hat? It’s very childish.

      • http://www.ambiencechaser.com/ Elizabeth Licata

        Yeah, it’s much better to rage about how other people are too sensitive than to reflect on one’s own actions and the effect they might have on other people. That’s much less childish.

      • Nbl

        Aw that’s cute. You don’t understand sarcasm.

      • AlbinoWino

        Please tell us YOUR cultural heritage so we can mock it and then ask you why you’re upset. Of course, my assumption that you’d even be upset would imply that you have feelings and resemble a human being so I guess I won’t hold my breath. Sigh.

      • Isabelle Rose

        Are you Native American?

        But personally, I’m a mix of Irish, Italian, Welch and I have ancestors from Canada and I think a little bit of heritage in Scotland. Anyone who would like to mock any of those countries/ histories feel free I wouldn’t be offended in the slightest.

      • AlbinoWino

        I’m not Native American but I attended a college with a significant Native population. During that time I befriended many people of Native ancestry and yes, bothered to get their side of the story on things. I also had Native professors that I very much respected. The fact is that white people (especially Americans) don’t really have much of a culture. I am of British, Dutch, and German heritage mixed with a bit of the unknown. I don’t feel a connection to these backgrounds so I’m not easily offended myself if things are said against these cultures. Because of the fact that I am white and privileged I try to at least attempt to learn about other cultures and how they feel about themselves instead of just looking at it through the lens of a white person. I will never know what it is to be Native so therefore I’m not going to try to decide what should and shouldn’t be offensive to them. I just ask and try not to be an ignorant a-hole. And even if I don’t understand all of it, I at least have the courtesy to listen and be open instead of thinking ME ME ME ME ME!!! And that’s what you’re doing. You’re angry people are offended because it’s not convenient for YOU. It’s not about too much political correctness. It’s about you being lazy and trying to find an excuse for your ignorance and intolerance.

      • Elizabeth Aspen

        Well, I remember a “funzy” episode of Dharma and Greg where Dharma wore a headdress right alongside a famous Native American actor and I don’t recall him or anyone else getting all verklempt about it. Oh wait – verklempt, that’s Yiddish, right? Oh my god, I’m such a racist!! My bad!!!

      • Myndee

        Ok, so by your logic I can walk around in black face for “funzies” and it’s not racist, hell I’ll even through around the N word! Because ya know, I’m just doing it to be fun and dress up.

      • Simba711

        You probably do that every night.

      • Cassandra Hough

        Did you really just compare real life to a carefully scripted, intentional sitcom from the ’90s? Wow, bravo.

      • MC12

        There’s nothing offensive about it. If you have a problem with white people wearing the native american headdress then you’re racist.

      • Myndee

        Seriously? I’m racist for thinking it’s offensive to wear something that’s so important to their culture? Yeah, you’re logic is flawed at best.

      • AlbinoWino

        Ummmm….what? I don’t think you understand how racism works. Please quit life.

      • FemelleChevalier

        Some PC mentality can seem whiny, but I fully understand why people get so offended about this.

        In my country, we have different types of indigenous people. They have their own unique artifacts that you are only allowed to wear IF they allowed you to — an unspoken understanding. Mostly, an outsider can wear it if they’re celebrating a festival, some traditional event, or for a performance to honor the indigenous people’s culture (e.g. Ati-Atihan Festival).

        So, if one wore a cultural artifact as a mere fashion statement for shits and giggles, it kinda defeats the purpose of said artifact. Plus, I personally think it’s weird. I mean, I wouldn’t parade around carrying a decorative sword or something even if my ancestor could be a Sultan, Datu, or a Rajah.

      • Elizabeth Aspen

        So, what do tourists do when they travel to foreign countries and buy souveneirs of that culture that were hand-made by native people so they can make money to live on?

        Should we not step on Persian rugs bought in the Middle East? Should we not wear shawls bought in Mexico handmade by Mexicans? Should I get rid of the hand-woven-from-the-rain-forest scrapbooks I bought in Peru? Should we never ever dye our blouses with a batik pattern?

        Christ, where does all this PC shit end?

      • Nbl

        Are you seriously comparing handmade crafts to the symbol of a people’s culture, honor, and hierarchy? There’s a HUGE difference between those items you listed and a Native American headdress! The fact that you seem perfectly fine with demeaning a cultures sacred symbol by comparing it to souvenirs shows that you will never understand the real issue here and need just to stop talking.

      • Simba711

        It was made in China.

      • FemelleChevalier

        Er, those are meant to be sold. That’s different, you know.

        I’m far from being PC, but I think it’s silly how a significant cultural artifact is comparable to a marketable native product. I mean, my grandmama’s province has loads of native things that Native people sells. But those are fairly insignificant compared to things that are used in a traditional and ceremonial setting.

      • AlbinoWino

        Buying something from a group of indigenous people that they crafted and sold is supporting them and often in a way they’re ok with. Pretty sure Natives weren’t any part of this fake headdress being made or profited on by someone else. And therein lies the point. Complaining about people being “too PC” is just another way of you saying that you don’t want to have to care for the feelings of others because it’s inconvenient for your or worse, could lessen your fun. I think the more general way of looking at this would be it makes you a shitty, lazy human being. Does that help?

      • Nbl

        Who? The Native Americans, that’s who. YOU don’t get the right to tell someone how they feel about the way their culture is displayed and you most certainly DO NOT have the right to tell someone what is offensive to them. Over the past few years many Native Americans have come forward explaining why they find this offensive. Very clear, articulate explanations. Maybe instead of getting pissy about the world being too “PC”, look up those arguments and learn how to respect someone else’s view. That’s not politically correct, that’s just being a decent human being

      • guest

        I’m Canadian and the status of North Americans is a very delicate issue. It is not appropriate or respectful to wear something that is sacred and spiritual to a group of human beings. And to answer your question on who makes the rules? Nobody does but it’s easy to be ignorant and stupid and its expected to have a little bit of awareness when she’s got millions of dollars.

      • Alexis Rhiannon

        Totally agree.

    • simoneutecht

      But aren’t they Armenian?

      • Myndee

        They’ll find a long lost cousin 27 times removed to claim Native American ancestry. Their mother was suddenly half Armenian a few years ago after never claiming it.

      • simoneutecht

        True dat they are the masters of spin.

      • Cassandra Hough

        I’d be interested to see how they’d feel if another celebrity used Armenian artifacts as a prop for a “cute photo.”

      • Myndee

        They’d be the first to cry foul, just like everyone who says knock off the PC bs would be the first to cry foul if someone did something to offend their culture.

      • Simba711

        Will that photo make them money? If not, I doubt it.

    • Elizabeth Aspen

      Good lord, knock it off with the PC shit already! God, every single day it seems the authors on this site get their panties in a bunch over NOTHING. The girl is wearing a headdress. BIG. DEAL. There’s nothing remotely offensive about it, she’s not doing a rain dance and going, ‘Woowoowoowoo!’ with her hand over her mouth, for god sake. I’m the last one to defend anything named Kardashian, but jeez, already.

      • Cassandra Hough

        You’re right. Why elevate ourselves to a higher level of tolerance and understanding? Intelligence and thoughtfulness is so overrated! Let’s all just say and do whatever the fuck we want and then cry and whine when there are consequences! YAASSSS!

      • Isabelle Rose

        I think people who love being PC, do so because they have no faith in people knowing right from wrong or have any moral compass so they feel the need to be the first and the loudest to point out that something is wrong and discriminatory. The PC movement fails because they believe they’re right with no discussion to be had on the topic.

      • AlbinoWino

        Or maybe some of us open a book every once in a while to learn something. Or maybe we try to put ourselves in the shoes of others and examine how other people might feel about something. You know, these great things called human compassion and understanding. These concepts must be foreign to you because you are likely soulless. You know, I have actually taken the time out of my day to ask Native people I’ve known how I feel about this. Have you bothered to do this? Doubt it. You’re too busy being an uppity ass wipe who is convinced they must ALWAYS be right. Congrats.

      • Isabelle Rose

        You are essentially proving my point.

      • AlbinoWino

        Proving it how? All you’ve proven is that you don’t like people disagreeing with you and potentially ruining your fun. I have had plenty discussion on the topic. You have done nothing to solidify the argument that wearing a headdress can’t be offensive to the culture it’s appropriating. If I thought there could be no discussion on the topic I’d say you’re wrong and you’re stupid the end. Instead what people on here have done in part is use arguments to illustrate why it’s offensive and how it’s really not that hard to NOT appropriate a culture and it’s not really even inconvenient. You don’t have an argument. You just want to say that people can do offensive things and people are foolish if they are offended by those actions. Just because racism isn’t as blatant as it once was doesn’t mean that it isn’t alive and thriving today.

      • Alexis Rhiannon

        That’s lucky, because you aren’t.

      • Nbl

        You’re probably that person that talks about none of this being a big deal but the minute something remotely discrimitory towards a white person happens you scream racism

      • AlbinoWino

        Haha. EXACTLY!! Who will save the whites??!!!!

      • Isabelle Rose

        Preach.

    • MC12

      How is this offensive?? Are white people not allowed to wear native american headdress? I didn’t know that.

      • The Actual Devil

        Well, now you know. I know it is a great hardship for us not-native Americans. Practically as bad as being slaughtered, forced to relocate, punished for speaking your own language or wearing your own cultural dress, and having your children taken from you.

      • Myndee

        Preach it!! That person up there called me a racist because I said it’s offensive. So I guess black face isn’t offensive then? Or making Asian eyes for funzies? Pretty sure the first time someone non white does something to offend a white person they would be the first person to cry foul. It’s no about being PC, it’s about respecting someone’s culture that’s been a tradition for hundreds of years!

      • Isabelle Rose

        Did any of us do that though?

      • Alexis Rhiannon

        No…but perpetuating those same stereotypes is doing absolutely nothing to put those atrocities behind us.

      • Isabelle Rose

        But what negative stereotypes are being perpetuating exactly? And how are they dredging up the cruelty Native Americans faced when we were pilgrims?

      • AlbinoWino

        Ummm….they still suffer that cruelty often living on reservations in terrible poverty. Where the life expectancy is significantly lower than the rest of the country, where there’s a high rate of substance abuse, a high rate of unemployment. There’s really no getting around the fact that white people were and STILL ARE responsible for this. But hey, we can just take something sacred of theirs for funsies and mock it. WHY NOT?!!!

    • Napoleon

      Why is it difficult to respect Native American culture? Is refraining from using demeaning terminology, wearing headdresses, and portraying Native people as caricatures asking too much?

    • Simba711

      I grew up in New Orleans. Every Super Sunday and Secondline folks dress up. Her headdress isn’t even real one. I’m sure it comes from China like most *beep* in your home.

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