Scout Willis Is Still Patting Herself On The Back For That Topless Instagram Protest (NSFW)

Scout Willis attending Nylon Magazine Young Hollywood Issue party with nipple May 2014[Update: apparently mastectomy tattoos are now allowed on Instagram and Facebook, with many crediting Scout for bringing public awareness to the issue. So I'm a dick. Honestly, great job, Scout!

...I still think your post is silly.]

Remember last week when Scout Willis was walking around Manhattan with no shirt on to protest Instagram? I know that sounds like a Mad Lib, but it’s something that actually happened in real life.

Well anyway, she explained herself and her intentions a little bit as she was doing it, but now that it’s getting more attention in the media, she’s taken to xojane to illuminate the whole thing for us. HOW LUCKY.

First of all, before we get started with anything it’s important to know that this is Very Important Work. You might think that Scout is just taking a stand against a website that removed her as a user for breaking its written-out rules, but actually she’s rebelling against body politics. Instagram has a set of guidelines in place to protect its users from mature or inappropriate content, and they are very clear about the fact that they will remove any photos that show the nipple, or even a glimpse of any areola.

Scout has a point that that’s not necessarily fair, given that A. men get to be shirtless, B. it’s legal for women to be topless in public in some areas, including New York City, and C. that Instagram allows many other demeaning, degrading images of women to remain on the site. But that said, their rules are very clear. If they see areola, the photo goes. If that’s an issue for you, either don’t post photos of your boobs, or use another site. You’ve already proven that you can be topless in public as much as you want, so why are you making an issue with one social media platform when so many others place absolutely no restrictions on the images that go up there.

 

 

Basically what I’m getting at is that Scout can really do exactly what she wants…and apparently in this case, what she wants is to write a long, rambling piece for xojane in which she mistakes not being able to get exactly what she wants on Instagram with being oppressed.

“What began as a challenge to Instagram and its prejudiced community guidelines became an opportunity for dialogue. Matters like the taboo of the nipple in the 21st century, public breastfeeding, slut shaming, fat shaming, breast cancer awareness, body positivity, gender inequality, and censorship have found their way into mainstream discussion.”

First of all, I don’t know if that’s true, if this situation spurred those conversations. If it did, great, but the bottom line is that Instagram is a community, and if you want to be a member of the community, you have to follow the rules.

“I understand that people don’t want to take me seriously. Or would rather just write me off as an attention-seeking, over-privileged, ignorant, white girl. I am white and I was born to a high profile and financially privileged family. I didn’t choose my public life, but it did give me this platform. A platform that helps make body politics newsworthy.”

Yes, thank you very much for contributing to this (genuinely very important) platform for equality by spending two hours topless outside because you got kicked off a (very unimportant) social media platform. Those things are totally the same. Thank goodness you’re able to see that, a

“I never claimed to believe that my actions of the past 48 hours would solve anything — far from it. But what they did achieve was to provoke conversations about gender equality and body positivity that are both necessary and sorely lacking. I am humbled to be part of any action that’s helped push the discussion of women’s rights into the spotlight. Which is where I believe it should remain, focused on what’s really important and most certainly not on me as an individual.”

Say what you want, but going topless for a few hours to protest an arbitrary Instagram community guideline is literally the least you could do, and I hope you know that.

(Photo: FayesVision / WENN.com)

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    • Jenni

      #Hero

    • Emily

      Yeah okay her protest isn’t exactly revolutionary and seems kind of naive, but why are we snarking on someone trying to promote female body positivity? I love crushable because it has so many great pieces on empowerment, feminism, etc…so why are we coming down on someone trying to do the same? And actually her bit in the XOJane piece about how it used to be extremely taboo and sexual for men to show their nipples in the 1930s was really interesting…

      • Alexis Rhiannon

        Yeah, she definitely makes good points about all the male nipple stuff, I just think it’s backward to be pushing for rights on a social media platform that she already has in real life.

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